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For news on events which Check4Cancer are hosting, attending or exhibiting at, please click here

October, 2016

ONCOassist app adds PREDICT algorithm, licensed from Cambridge Enterprise, to help doctors make critical treatment decisions following breast cancer surgery

Chief Medical Officer at Check4Cancer, Prof Gordon Wishart led a team of clinicians and scientists to develop the PREDICT survival and treatment benefit model.

September, 2016

Check4Cancer will be exhibiting at the largest dedicated reward and benefits event in Europe – Employee Benefits Live 

EB Live Olympia Logo

Check4Cancer will be exhibiting at the largest dedicated reward and benefits event in Europe - Employee Benefits Live on 11th and 12th October 2016 at Olympia London. 

July, 2016

With schools having broken up for the summer holidays and long days ahead, it’s more important then ever for parents to consider the impact of sun damage on their children – as a recent story reported in the Daily Mail has brought home.

Jennifer Nicholson, 50, spoke of her heartbreak after her 18-year-old daughter, Freja, died of skin cancer as a result of childhood holidays in the sun. The mother blamed herself for not always applying sunscreen to her daughter's fair skin during the hot British summers of her childhood. Doctors said if she had, Freja might still be alive.

July, 2016

Great strides have been made in the detection and treatment of cervical cancer since the national Cervical Screening Programme in 1988, with an estimated 100,000 lives having been saved by 2012. Now, our understanding of the connection with a sexually acquired virus is helping to make cervical cancer an almost entirely preventable disease.

Jullien Brady – Clinical Advisor for GynaeCheck and Check4Cancer – is also a Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at Bedford Hospital, with extensive experience in the UK cervical screening programme. He explains: “Cervical cancer is effectively a sexually transmitted disease. We now know that almost all cases are caused by exposure to certain strains of human papillomavirus, or HPV.

July, 2016

A major new study – the largest of its kind ever undertaken – has been hailed as a milestone in the understanding of breast cancer and its causes.

The new study, published in Nature, provides a “near-perfect picture” of the genetic processes that lead to breast cancer and opens up new possibilities for treatment and prevention of the disease.

July, 2016

A “superior” test for cervical cancer is now being offered to millions of women following a successful pilot programme in the UK.

The test, which targets HPV (human papilloma virus), is being rolled out in surgeries and clinics and should be available nationwide within two years.

July, 2016

Extended periods of sunshine may be as difficult as ever to predict during the Great British summer – but that gives us all the more reason to keep in mind our risk of skin cancer.

When the weather is hot and sunny, the intense UV radiation from the sun’s rays can pose a very real threat and adequate sun protection is required. Variable weather can lull us into a false sense of security, however, with cloudy or rainy periods making is feel we don’t need to bother with sun protection. Even short periods of exposure can put us at risk, however.

June, 2016

Delegates from leading businesses gathered at Home House in London on 31 May 2016 to hear well-known experts discuss the current cancer epidemic and why it’s crucial for employers to address cancer in the workplace. 

June, 2016

A new report suggests that over the next two decades the UK could be hit by 670,000 new cases of cancer that have an entirely preventable cause.

The report, issued by the Obesity Health Alliance, looked at the impact obesity has on the nation’s health and concluded that more than 7.6 million new cases of disease linked to being overweight or obese could be diagnosed in the UK during the next 20 years. This includes an additional 4.62 million cases of type 2 diabetes and 1.63 million cases of coronary heart disease, as well as the predicted 670,000 new cases of cancer. In 2035 alone, around 440,000 new cases of disease could be caused by being overweight and obese in the UK.

June, 2016

Under the current legislation you don’t have to tell your boss if you have cancer. The worry for many people is what it means for their career - will they be written off, never again seen as an effective, ‘can-do’ employee? Being open about such a serious condition is important when it comes to getting support and understanding, making sure you get the flexibility you need from an employer.

June, 2016

20 June 2016 - Cigna UK HealthCare Benefits (Cigna) and SkinHealth UK have formed an alliance to offer Cigna customers skin cancer diagnostics beginning June 2016. This new service offers customers rapid access to skin cancer specialists.

New research shows that 25 percent of all cancer sufferers see their General Practitioner (GP) three times before being referred for further tests.¹ With Cigna’s new service, customers can self-refer for a skin cancer diagnostic appointment within five working days. 

June, 2016

To mark Cervical Cancer Awareness Week – a UK-wide initiative led by Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust – Mr Jullien Brady, Clinical Advisor for Check4Cancer, answers some key questions about cervical cancer, detection and treatment.

June, 2016

A new study funded by Cancer Research UK has shown that people are not reporting cancer alarm symptoms because they are worried they may be wasting their GP’s time.

The study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, explored the reasons why some people are more likely to worry about wasting a GP’s time and delay reporting possible cancer symptoms. Some felt that long waiting times indicated GPs were so busy they “shouldn’t bother making an appointment unless symptoms seemed very serious”. There was a perception that the GP “wasn’t interested”.

May, 2016

Employers are being left exposed to the fallout from cancer cases by a lack of specific planning, support and management according to the results of a new survey issued to 500 HR professionals.

71% of HR managers surveyed say they don’t have any policies in place for communications or management of employees with a cancer diagnosis. 48% believe line managers in their organisation are unprepared when it comes to managing staff with cancer, with 13% saying they don’t think managers are prepared ‘at all’. At the same time, over half think the line manager relationship is the most important form of support for employees with cancer.

May, 2016

Gordon Wishart, Professor of Cancer Surgery and Chief Medical Officer of Check4Cancer has called for self-examination to be a priority amongst women as part of the fight against breast cancer.

“Women themselves are the first line of defence when it comes to breast health,” he says, “not only by moderating lifestyle factors that affect their risk but because they are best placed to detect unusual changes in their own bodies. So often cancer makes us feel that we are not in control of our health, but self-checking gives some of that sense of control back. More importantly, it also saves lives: around 90% of breast lumps are found by women themselves.”

May, 2016

To mark Skin Cancer Awareness Month (May), Per Hall, Clinical Advisor for SkinHealth UK, talks about skin cancer awareness, risk factors and how our attitudes need to change.

People have become much more aware of the dangers of UV exposure in recent years, and the precautions we can take against it are relatively simple – but are people as aware as they should be?

May, 2016

A new survey carried out by a leading prostate cancer charity has revealed a serious lack of awareness among men about their own bodies and their risk of prostate cancer, despite the fact that one man every hour dies from the disease.

The research carried out by Prostate Cancer UK, which surveyed almost 2,000 men, showed that most had no idea what the gland did or even that they had one. 92% of them did not know that the prostate helps make the fluid sperm swims in and contains muscles for ejaculation, whilst more than half did not know where it was in their body. 17% of those surveyed were unaware of it altogether.

April, 2016

To mark Bowel Cancer Awareness Month Justin Davies, Clinical Adviser for Check4Cancer, talks about new developments in screening techniques, risk factors and why all those who are invited should take the test.

March, 2016

Increasing pressure on NHS resources and the squeeze on funding means employees face more limited services and potential delays in treatment if completely reliant on free health services for themselves and their families. And this, inevitably, means a knock-on effect for employers. But this is where employers can step up to the plate – and it makes the benefits and health and wellbeing support provided all the more crucial.

Here are five things you need to know about the NHS and employee health.

March, 2016

To mark Prostate Cancer Awareness Month (March) Vincent Gnanapragasam, Clinical Director for ProstateHealth UK, talks about the importance of screening and how greater awareness can help save lives.

February, 2016

New figures released by Cancer Research UK have shown a 12% increase in the rate of cancer since the mid-90s.

More than 352,000 people are now diagnosed with cancer in the UK each year, compared with more than 253,000 people getting the disease every year two decades before (a rise from 540 per 100,000 people in 1993-1995 to 603 per 100,000 in 2011-2013).

February, 2016

Whilst we often complain about grey winter days, winter sun can bring hidden dangers – especially for those enjoying winter sports.

According to Cancer Research UK there is strong evidence to show that overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the main preventable cause of skin cancers – both malignant melanoma and non- melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Sunbeds produce artificial UV radiation, but the sun is the principal source of natural UV radiation. A study published in 2011 estimated that 86% of melanomas in the UK (around 11,100 cases) every year are linked to too much exposure to sunlight and sunbed use.

February, 2016

1. Globally, one in every eight deaths is caused by cancer – more than malaria, tuberculosis and AIDS combined. According to figures from Cancer Research UK, 338,623 people in the UK were diagnosed with cancer in 2012 – that’s 590.5 people per 100,000 of the population. There were also 161,823 deaths from cancer (168.6 people per 100,000 of the population).

2. Cancer is increasing: one in two UK people born after 1960 will be diagnosed with some form of cancer during their lifetime. Cancers of the breast, lung, prostate and bowel account for over half (53%) of all new cancer cases.

February, 2016

2015 proved a turbulent year for national and international politics – but the news that dominated the New Year was cancer, with musicians Lemmy and David Bowie and actor Alan Rickman all dying of the disease within days of each other.

“These deaths occurring so close together were widely regarded as a tragic coincidence,” says Gordon Wishart, Professor of Cancer Surgery and Medical Director of Check4Cancer. “Unfortunately they are indicative of general trends, and we are likely to see this more often. Celebrity cases can help focus attention on efforts to combat the disease, but the important message we need to get across is that cancer affects us all. One in two people born after 1960 will be diagnosed with some form of cancer during their lifetime, so if it is not us, it will be someone we know.”

January, 2016

A newly launched Cancer Research UK study could be the first step towards exercise training being introduced as a new NHS treatment for prostate cancer.

The PANTERA study, led by Sheffield Hallam University, will focus on 50 men who have the disease, but whose cancer has not spread. This trial – believed to be the first of its kind in the world – would aim to test whether regular exercise can help keep prostate cancer from spreading to other parts of the body and could be a viable NHS treatment.

January, 2016

To mark Cervical Cancer Prevention Week – a UK-wide initiative led by Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust – Mr Jullien Brady, Clinical Advisor for Check4Cancer, talks about the importance of screening, HPV and the challenge of getting more women to attend their tests.

January, 2016

GeneHealth UK (part of the Check4Cancer Ltd group of companies) is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr Antonis Pantazis as Clinical Advisor - Cardio.

December, 2015

Getting cancer is often seen as being down to bad genes or bad luck, but new research shows that as many as nine out of ten cancers are due to environmental or lifestyle factors.

The study, carried out by scientists from Stony Brook University in New York and published in the journal Nature, overturns the so-called ‘bad luck hypothesis’ – the idea that many cancers are due to random cell mutations. In January 2015, a study from Johns Hopkins University had suggested that 65% of cancers were driven by random mistakes in cell division and were therefore inevitable, and completely outside our control.

December, 2015

Professor Gordon Wishart, Professor of cancer surgery and Medical Director at Check4Cancer, explores the crucial role cancer awareness and screening programmes in the workplace play in raising awareness of cancer.

Incidences of cancer are steadily rising with latest estimates suggesting that over 750,000 people of working age are living with a cancer diagnosis in the UK.

December, 2015

There are few workplaces that have not been in some way affected by cancer. Many of us will have participated in some form of fundraising as a direct result of a colleague’s diagnosis, and sadly such instances are becoming more common.

December, 2015

Most of us are aware of cancer risks associated with specific working environments. Asbestos is widely known as a highly dangerous, cancer-causing substance, and the dangers of pollutants or exposure to sunlight are broadly understood by those who routinely work with them – and with employers fully expected to offer necessary precautions. But how many of us are aware that the one thing we do most often at work, simply sitting down, is increasing our risk of cancer – and to such an extent that it has prompted US experts to announce “sitting is the new smoking”?

November, 2015

Sales of bacon and sausages fell by £3m in UK supermarkets in just two weeks following the World Health Organization’s announcement that processed meats are “definite” carcinogens.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, placed processed meats in the same category as smoking, asbestos and plutonium. But, shocking as that sounds, it does not mean that the risk of cancer is elevated to the same level by all these substances or processes.

November, 2015

Sam Janes, Clinical Advisor for LungHealth UK and Check4Cancer, talks about shockingly high mortality rates for lung cancer, the importance of screening, and how new test methods can save more lives.

November, 2015

Check4Cancer Ltd is delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Sam Janes as new Clinical Advisor for their early detection programme in lung cancer.

November, 2015

Adiona Magazine: Rising numbers of cancer diagnoses in the working age population are becoming a major issue for HR. 700,000 employees are currently living with cancer in the UK, with predictions from Cancer Research that by 2027 around half of the population will have the disease at some point in their life.  

October, 2015

Following evaluation of the carcinogenicity of the consumption of red meat and processed meat, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) – the cancer agency of the World Health Organization – has placed processed meats in the same category as smoking, asbestos and plutonium.

After reviewing the accumulated scientific literature, a Working Group of 22 experts from 10 countries convened by the IARC Monographs Programme classified the consumption of red meat as “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A), based on limited evidence that the consumption of red meat causes cancer in humans and “strong mechanistic evidence supporting a carcinogenic effect”. This association was observed mainly for colorectal cancer, but associations were also seen for pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer.

October, 2015

Delegates from leading employers, health insurers and employee benefit consultancies gathered at The Walbrook Building in London on 8 October to hear leading experts speak on the urgent need for employers to address cancer in the workplace. The breakfast seminar – introduced by Stewart Ireland, Sales and Marketing Directorof Arthur J. Gallagher – revealed that currently one in three people in the UK will develop cancer in their lifetime, and that for those born after 1960 the risk is already one in two. 

October, 2015

The Daily Telegraph recently reported on the growing problem of GP referrals for cancer in England – including new research suggesting that thousands of cancer patients are dying needlessly because GPs do not refer them for fast-track appointments, in spite of guidelines being in place encouraging them to do so.

The research, published in the British Medical Journal, and led by Prof Henrik Møller of Kings College, London, set out to “assess the overall effect of the English urgent referral pathway on cancer survival”. The cohort study looked at 8,049 general practices in England, linking information from the national Cancer Waiting Times database, NHS Exeter database, and National Cancer Register. This information was used to estimate mortality in patients in relation to the propensity of their general practice to use the urgent referral pathway. In total, 215,284 patients with cancer, diagnosed or first treated in England in 2009 and followed up to 2013, were included in the study.

October, 2015

To mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Professor Gordon Wishart – Gordon Wishart, Professor of Cancer Surgery and Medical Director of Check4Cancer – talks about the importance of breast screening, why it is a success story and how women can help to reduce their own risk.

October, 2015

Cigna UK HealthCare Benefits (Cigna) and BreastHealth UK (part of Check4Cancer group of companies) have formed an alliance to offer Cigna customers OneStop breast cancer diagnostics from beginning January 2016. This new service offers customers rapid access to breast cancer specialists.

October, 2015

Being given a cancer diagnosis is devastating, however an early detection of cancer can make all the difference when it comes to employees and employers.

A new web tool has been developed which will allow an organisation to assess the financial savings of introducing company-paid early detection of cancer.

October, 2015

A new web tool will allow organisations to assess the financial savings from introducing company-paid early detection of cancer.

October, 2015

The free Cancer Impact Calculator – developed by Check4Cancer with Health At Work Wellness Actuaries (HAW) – comes in the context of Cancer Research UK claims that nearly half the UK population are now expected to suffer from the disease at some point in their lives. More than 100,000 UK employees are diagnosed with cancer each year and numbers are rising.

September, 2015

Genetics play a major role in our health and wellbeing.

Just as they determine hair colour and personality, genes also influence what medical conditions are passed down from our parents.

Faulty genes can trigger health problems including growth disorders, heart conditions and cancer.

September, 2015

Employee Benefits Live is Europe's largest dedicated reward and benefits event offering expert insight, information and inspiration to the thousands of compensation, benefits and HR professionals who visit each year. This highly popular annual event attracts senior HR and Benefits professionals from hundreds of organisations across the UK.

The Check4Cancer team were taken aback with the level of interest in an early detection of cancer at workplace in this event. Managing Director of Check4Cancer, Troels Jordansen, was impressed by the quality of visitors to the Check4Cancer stand; "It was a great show and turn out, we were pleased to see so many employers who are interested in awareness and early detection of cancer in the workplace."

September, 2015

September is Gynaecological Cancer Awareness Month, and GynaeHealth UK (part of Check4Cancer group) are deligther to share with you the guest blog by women’s cancer charity - The Eve Appeal who lead this in the UK and encourages women to open up and talk more freely about the signs and symptoms of gynaecological cancers.

Here, Chief Executive of The Eve Appeal, Athena Lamnisos talks candidly about the importance of raising awareness of these cancers, busting the myths and lifting the taboos around their signs and symptoms:

It’s clear from our perspective that gynaecological cancers are not talked about enough or a well profiled cause – given the general public’s lack of knowledge around key signs and symptoms, which were highlighted in our campaign last year. One in five women aged 16-25 couldn’t name a single symptom of any of the five gynaecological cancers and the majority of under 35s couldn’t correctly label the vagina on an anatomical diagram.

September, 2015

Earlier this year, we reported on the new cancer task force, set up to combat long waiting times for diagnoses in England – 25% of which were being made too late. Now, further plans have been unveiled, including a target of 95% of people being given a diagnosis or the all-clear within 28 days of being referred by their GP, by 2020.

Figures released in May showed that more than 21,000 people had not been treated within 62 days of their cancer diagnosis in the last financial year, and the NHS had failed to achieve its own targets for treatment. According to these, 85% of cancer patients should be treated within 62 days of being urgently referred by their GP, but just 83.4% were seen on time in 2014-15. While survival rates have been improving, England still lags behind some of the best performing countries. A cross-party committee of MPs recently warned that England’s cancer services had “lost momentum”.

September, 2015

The number of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases has risen by a fifth in a decade according to new analysis by Breast Cancer Care – yet there has been no rise in specialist breast cancer nurse posts.

The figures show that the numbers of newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer in England have risen by 18% from 38,153 in 2003 to 44,831 in 2013. Similarly in Wales and Scotland the rise of breast cancer cases is around 20%.

September, 2015

Results from the largest ever randomised trial for lung cancer have provided new evidence of the value of employer-led testing to save lives and reduce healthcare costs.

The initial results from a study by NHS Scotland ECLS of 10,000 high-risk smokers demonstrate a higher than expected cancer detection rate (sensitivity) of 81%, with a specificity (chance that a negative test excludes lung cancer) of 91%. The data is based on the EarlyCDT-Lung blood test developed by Nottingham firm OncImmune that detects autoantibody biomarkers. The research findings are to be officially released on September 7th 2015 at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer.

September, 2015

Treatment and detection of cervical cancer has changed radically in the past 25 years, largely as a result of the national screening programme – but there are still signs we need to be wary of, and act upon immediately.

Following the introduction of the national screening programme in 1988, incidence of cervical cancer dropped dramatically. By 2003-2005 it had decreased by 49% (although there has been a small rise of 8% since). Mortality rates have also decreased by 71% between 1971-1973 and 2010-2012, and it is now estimated that cervical screening prevents around 5,000 deaths each year in the UK.

August, 2015

This summer in the UK has seen days of intense sun alternate with grey skies with startling rapidity. Whilst we might think we’re more at risk from long periods of unrelenting sun, it’s often when it is intermittent that we become more lax – and we cannot afford to be.

Approximately 13,300 people are diagnosed with malignant melanoma in the UK each year, making it the fifth most widespread cancer. It is also the second most common cancer in young adults (aged 15-34) and 2,100 people die from the disease each year. It is far from being a young person’s disease, however.

August, 2015

Aspirin can more than halve bowel cancer risk in obese people with Lynch syndrome – an inherited condition linked to an increased risk of cancer – according to data from a UK clinical trial.

The new analysis of the CAPP2 trial, reported by Cancer Research UK, showed that obesity heightened the risk of bowel cancer among people with the condition, who already have a much higher risk of bowel and other cancers than the general population.

August, 2015

Regular consumption of caffeinated coffee may help prevent the return of colon cancer after treatment and improve the chances of a cure, according to a new, large study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute that reported this striking association for the first time.

The patients, all of them treated with surgery and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer, had the greatest benefit from consuming four or more cups of coffee a day (about 460 milligrams of caffeine), according to the study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. These patients were 42% less likely to have their cancer return than non-coffee drinkers, and were 33% less likely to die from cancer or any other cause.

August, 2015

This week, the BBC reports on new research findings that demonstrate how even light consumption of alcohol can increase cancer risk – but the risk primarily affects women.

The US research, published in the British Medical Journal this month, is titled “Light to moderate intake of alcohol, drinking patterns, and risk of cancer” and sets out “to quantify risk of overall cancer across all levels of alcohol consumption among women and men separately, with a focus on light to moderate drinking and never smokers; and assess the influence of drinking patterns on overall cancer risk.”

August, 2015

A new study has revealed that almost a quarter of cancer patients had to make at least three visits to their GP before being sent to hospital for tests that diagnosed their illness.

The research – published in the European Journal of Cancer Care – was undertaken by academics at Cambridge University who studied the experiences of more than 70,000 patients. They found that a total of 23% had been seen by their GP three or more times before being referred to hospital for further scans, blood tests or investigations which diagnosed the illness.

August, 2015

This week, the BBC reports on new guidelines for diagnosing and treating melanoma skin cancers that have been issued to the NHS in England.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has issued the guidelines to help end “a wide variation in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease”. They include advice on diagnosing how far the cancer has progressed, on identifying the best treatment and suggest improvements to follow-up care.

July, 2015

Cancer Research UK scientists have for the first time identified that there are five distinct types of prostate cancer and found a way to distinguish between them, according to a landmark study published in EbioMedicine.

The findings could have important implications for how doctors treat prostate cancer in the future, by identifying tumours that are more likely to grow and spread aggressively through the body.

July, 2015

This week, Sarah Montague – a night-time presenter for the BBC – investigated the impact of shift work on health, and found that regular disruption of normal sleep patterns can significantly raise your susceptibility to serious illness, including cancer.

In the programme The Night Shift, broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Monday 27 July, 8.00pm-8.30pm, Sarah Montague, explored how sleeping affects our bodies in the company of two fellow night-workers.

July, 2015

In Cancer: The challenge facing the NHS BBC Health Correspondent Nick Triggle reveals the issues ahead for our struggling health service.

The analysis comes after the recent announcement of a new strategy by NHS England’s cancer taskforce aimed at improving cancer care. Figures released in May showed that more than 21,000 people had not been treated within 62 days of their cancer diagnosis in the last financial year. According to NHS targets, 85% of cancer patients should be treated within 62 days of being urgently referred by their GP, but just 83.4% were seen on time in 2014-15. While survival rates have been improving, England still lags behind some of the best performing countries.

July, 2015

Medico-legal experts have warned that UK GPs urgently need extra training to spot melanomas if they are reduce the growing number of legal cases brought against the profession.

The Medical Defence Union (MDU) – reported in GP online magazine – has called for GPs to receive better training to improve early diagnosis and referral of melanoma in the light of a rising number of legal complaints. Cases brought against medical professionals for missing or incorrectly diagnosing the disease have doubled in just a decade.

July, 2015

New research suggests that a cheap and safe drug could help half of women with breast cancer to live longer – and lead to a higher proportion of cures.

The study, published in Nature, looked into the effects of the hormone progesterone, and found that is could be used to slow the growth of some tumours.

July, 2015

Cases of lung cancer in women have reached 20,000 a year in the UK for the first time since records began, according to new Cancer Research UK statistics.

Lung cancer rates in women have increased by 22%, soaring from around 14,200 cases diagnosed around 20 years ago (in 1993 there were 14,176 female lung cancer cases in the UK). There were 19,857 female lung cancer cases in 2011 and 20,483 in 2012, UK.

June, 2015

The US’s National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is to include 4Kscore® – the test offered as part of ProstateCheck in the UK – as a recommended test in the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer Early Detection.

The panel concluded that the 4Kscore, as a blood test with greater specificity over the PSA test, is indicated for use prior to a first prostate biopsy or after a negative biopsy to assist patients and physicians in further defining the probability of high-grade cancer. David Okrongly, Ph.D., President of OPKO Diagnostics, who developed the test, said: “We are pleased that the NCCN, an organization leading the way in the establishment of evidence-based guidelines for cancer diagnostics, is recommending the use of the 4Kscore test in the 2015 Prostate Cancer Early Detection Guidelines.”

June, 2015

Melanoma is the sixth most common cancer in the UK, killing over 2,000 people in Britain each year, but as with all cancers, early detection remains the single most effective method for increasing chances of survival or achieving cure. Nevertheless, a recent survey of over a thousand people carried out by the British Association of Dermatologists revealed that 96% of us fail to check our skin the recommended once a month for skin cancer, and more than 77% would not recognise signs of the disease.

June, 2015

The results of a new study have established a link between prostate cancer and smoking, reports Science Daily.

Smoking has long been known to contribute to the risk of developing a variety of forms of cancer, but this is the first time a clear link has been established with prostate cancer. The link is not with the initial development of prostate cancer, however, but its recurrence following treatment.

June, 2015

Like other types of cancer, incidence of breast cancer is increasing, with around 50,000 new cases in the UK per annum. That means there is currently a lifetime risk of one in eight, which is predicted to rise to one in seven by 2024.

In spite of this, breast cancer can be considered a success story, asGordon Wishart, Professor of Cancer Surgery and Medical Director of Check4Cancer, explains: “While the incidence has been rising, the mortality rate for breast cancer has actually been falling since the 1980s. In fact, 2012 figures showed a fall of 45% for women aged 50-64 since 1989 – the year after the breast screening programme began. It demonstrates very clearly that investment in fighting cancer really can have a significant effect through cancer awareness and early detection.”

June, 2015

As Cervical Screening Awareness Week gets underway (15-21 June) the BBC reports how cervical cancer is perceived as a young woman's disease – despite the fact that half of deaths occur in women over 65.

A new survey reveals that, on average, there were 449 deaths as a result of cervical cancer between 2010 and 2012 amongst over-65s, compared to just seven in under-25s. The survey – published in the British Medical Journal – also argues that the age limit for cervical screening should be raised to 70 and that older women should be targeted in health campaigns.

June, 2015

To mark Cervical Screening Awareness Week – a UK-wide initiative led by Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust – Mr Jullien Brady, Clinical Advisor - GYN Check4Cancer, talks about the importance of screening, and how the latest developments can help save more lives.

First of all, can you tell us why the UK cervical screening programme is so important?

June, 2015

Over the past couple of years, we have seen a paradigm shift in the relationship between business and cancer, with more and more employers introducing cancer tests as a potential benefit for their employees. Many of these, of course, are large corporations with whole departments dedicated to HR and Wellbeing – but what do such developments mean for SMEs?

June, 2015

An article "Cambridge breast cancer surgeon Prof Gordon Wishart launches new genetic testing company", based on interview with Professor Gordon Wishart, was published By Cambridge News today. 

June, 2015

The Times reported recently on a call for all women to be screened for “Angelina Jolie-type genetic mutations” to prevent thousands of cases of cancer.

According to experts at the world’s biggest cancer conference in the United States, routine testing for BRCA mutations was a “no-brainer” that would save hundreds of lives a year, identifying women at higher risk in their 20s or 30s and so allowing them to opt for intensive screening or preventive surgery.

June, 2015

Father’s Day is June 21, and we would like to remind you that the best gifts for Dad are those that come from the heart.

June, 2015

Research published online in the journal Heart reveals that cancer has overtaken cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, as the UK's No 1 killer – but only among men. Cardiovascular disease is still the most common cause of death among women, and kills more young women than breast cancer, the figures show.

The researchers used the latest nationally available data (2012-13) for each of the four UK countries, and the Cardiovascular Disease Statistics 2014 report compiled for the British Heart Foundation (BHF), to quantify the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, and find out how it's treated, how much it costs, and how many deaths it causes. For the first time since the middle of the 20th century, cancer overtook cardiovascular disease as the primary cause of death in 2012.

June, 2015

The BBC reports how a new study, led by the World Health Organization's cancer agency, proves the effectiveness of breast cancer screening worldwide. 29 independent experts from 16 countries looked at 40 different studies and concluded that screening really did save lives.

The NHS estimates it saves 1,300 lives a year from breast cancer in the UK – but the proportion of women attending screening in England has dipped over the past few years, suggesting faltering confidence in its effectiveness.

June, 2015

According to a “milestone” trial, a new therapy can more than double life expectancy in some lung cancer patients.

The BBC reports how the revolutionary new drug, named Nivolumab, works in conjunction with the body’s defences, preventing cancerous cells from concealing themselves and making them open to attack by the patient’s own immune system.

The findings, published in the American Society of Clinical Oncology, were the result of a study of 582 patients conducted in both the US and Europe. It focused on patients who had advanced lung cancer, and for whom other treatments had been tried or were no longer effective. The study found that those on standard therapy lived, on average, for a further 9.4 months, while those taking the new drug lived for 12.2 months. Within that group, however, some did significantly better, living up to 19.4 months.

June, 2015

Check4Cancer's medical director Professor Gordon Wishart sets out the case for putting policies in place for dealing with cancer before it rears its ugly head among your workplace.

Check4Cancer has published a report entitled Cancer in the workplace: what does it mean for HR? Drawing on a specially commissioned survey of over 100 HR professionals, it provides first-hand insight into how cancer and its impact on the workplace is being percieved by businesses and suggests ways to tackle this growing issue.

June, 2015

A new study, published in the journal Leukemia and reported on the BBC News website, suggests that cancer cells can go to sleep and then reawaken years later – completely avoiding the effects of chemotherapy whilst dormant.

The new findings by the Institute of Cancer Research may explain why some cancers return years after they appear to have been cured, but also present the possibility of identifying the dormant cancer cells and killing them before they become a problem.

June, 2015

BBC News online reports this week on a revolutionary new treatment for skin cancer, using a genetically engineered version of herpes – the virus responsible for cold sores.

The research, published in full in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, was based on the largest ever randomised trial of an anti-cancer virus. 436 patients from 64 centres in the US, the UK, Canada and South Africa who had inoperable malignant melanoma took part, and according to the researchers the results showed real promise, having the potential to increase survival of some melanoma sufferers by years.

May, 2015

Over a quarter of a middle-aged person’s skin cells may have taken the first step to becoming cancerous, according to a study published in the journal Science this month.

The findings are the result of research by a team at the Sanger Institute, near Cambridge, which was based on analysis of samples from the eyelids of four 55- to 73-year-olds. The study found more than 100 DNA mutations linked to cancer in every 1 sq cm (0.1 sq in) of skin – a far greater proportion than anticipated.

May, 2015

New research has shown that boys who become obese as teenagers may double their risk of bowel cancer by the time they are in their 50s.

The study – published in the journal Gut, a British Medical Journal publication – was carried out by scientists from Harvard University and from Sweden, and focused on a large group of young Swedish men conscripted into military service aged 16-20.

May, 2015

In March we reported on figures showing that NHS targets for the treatment of cancer patients had been missed for the first three-quarters of 2014, with 5,500 patients having to wait longer than the specified period for treatment between July and September.

New figures just published by the NHS show this trend to have continued, with more than 21,000 people not having been seen within the 62-day target in the last financial year. According to NHS targets, 85% of cancer patients should be treated within 62 days of being urgently referred by their GP, but just 83.4% were seen on time in 2014-15.

May, 2015

Medical News Today reports that two new studies show an HPV test to be a more accurate means of screening for cervical cancer than the traditional Pap test (also known as the smear test in the UK).

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for over 70% of cervical cancers, and is potentially a key early indicator of cervical cancer risk. Both new studies published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology found that screening for HPV infection alone provides more accurate results for both HPV infection and cervical cancer screening than the alternatives of a Pap or a co-test for these conditions.

May, 2015

By PROFESSOR GORDON WISHART, Clinical Director, Check4Cancer

WHEN THE WORLD-LEADING international property and infrastructure group Lend Lease surveyed the employees in its EMEA arm, it brought to light a shocking fact. A large proportion of those employees worked outside, on construction sites, with prolonged exposure to sunlight – yet 52% of these admitted they did not use protection against the effects of the sun, in spite of the ready availability of sunscreen and an awareness that such precautions were sensible.

May, 2015

A new report published by Cancer Research UK, in collaboration with a range of international partners, has shown that men with naturally high levels of the female hormone oestrogen may have a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

May, 2015

In a new report by Check4Cancer, Cancer in the workplace: what does it mean for HR?, we take a look at the implications of cancer for employers, why it’s an important issue for workplaces to address and discuss the role HRs professionals can play to provide support to employees affected by this disease.

May, 2015

May 2015. A report by the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) has shown that people in the UK are still burying their heads in the sand when it comes to skin cancer.

The survey of over a thousand people – carried out by BAD and published to coincide with Sun Awareness Week 2015 (4-10 May) – revealed that 96% fail to check their skin the recommended once a month for skin cancer, and more than 77% would not recognise signs of the disease.

May, 2015

April 2015. A recent report on cancer in Scotland has shown that the incidence rate of malignant melanoma of the skin has increased by 30% over the last ten years.

The findings, issued by the Information Services Division (IDS), a unit of NHS National Services Scotland, formed part of the annual cancer incidence statistics for Scotland, published on 28 April 2015. This publication provides information on cancer incidence in Scotland covering the years 1989-2013 for each main type of cancer. Approximately 45 types of cancer are included, broken down by age group, sex, NHS Board and Cancer Regional Network.

May, 2015

It is calculated that, currently, one in three people in the UK will get cancer of one type in their lifetime. Cancer charity Macmillan estimate this will rise to one in two by the year 2020.

New methods used by Cancer Research UK to calculate these figures, however, suggest that the 50 percent level of cancer incidence may already be upon us. A recent survey conducted by Cancer Research UK also revealed that cancer is now the UKs number one fear, ahead of being in debt, old age, being the victim of knife crime, car accidents, having a heart attack or losing a job or home.

May, 2015

April, 2015. A new study reported by the BBC this week provides a dramatic demonstration of the effect of diet on the gut – and shows that deterioration of bowel health, which may bring increased cancer risk, is far more rapid than generally believed.

In a US-based experiment, 20 US volunteers swapped their diet – high in fats and sugars, and low in fibre – with a group of 20 volunteers from rural Africa, who were used to a low-fat, high-fibre diet.

April 2015. Thousands of lives and millions of pounds are being lost because bowel cancer is being detected too late, according to the UK charity Beating Bowel Cancer.

In a BBC health report – in which the charity quotes regional diagnostic figures from the National Cancer Intelligence Network's Cancer Commissioning Toolkit – it was revealed that the level of bowel cancer screening in the eligible 60- to 74-year-old age group stands at only 60%, despite a bowel cancer screening programme making such tests freely available in England.

Serious illness – particularly cancer – can have a devastating impact on your employees and your business, therefore it is essential to have a plan in place that ensures the best way forward for all concerned.

14th April 2015: The Guardian reports this week that almost a fifth of women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer after spotting a potential symptom wait more than a month before seeing their GP, “jeopardising their chances of effective treatment”.

Cambridge, 1st April 2015: Check4Cancer is the new name for International HealthScreen Technologies Ltd and HealthScreen UK, the organisation that specialises in providing services for early detection of cancer and cancer awareness resources for corporate clients. The change is effective from 1 April 2015, with services to clients and individuals will continue unaffected.

24 March: EXCLUSIVE: Hymans Robertson saw take up of its cancer screening programme reach 6% in the first year it was offered to its 750 employees.

The consultancy launched the scheme in 2014 as part of its flexible benefits scheme after it identified a need to introduce a cancer-specific programme.

Read more: on the Employee Benefits website

March 2015: A new study published in JAMA Oncology suggests that very fit men in their late 40s are less likely to get lung cancer and colorectal cancer than unfit men of the same age.

The study – carried out by University of Vermont researchers, led by Dr Susan G. Lakoski – found that even small improvements in fitness could help to reduce cancer risk, and that high fitness levels also appear to increase the chances of surviving cancer if it is diagnosed later on.

30th March: According to new analysis released by Macmillan Cancer Support, cancer survival rates in the UK are “at or behind a level that many other European countries had already achieved by the late 1990s”.

24th March: The BBC reported today that actress Angelina Jolie has had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed as a preventative measure against ovarian cancer.

Jolie – whose mother, grandmother and aunt all died of cancer – carries the mutated gene BRCA1, which significantly increases the carriers risk of developing cancer, specifically breast and ovarian cancer.

24th March The BBC reports that an experimental and unlicensed cancer drug is being fast-tracked to NHS patients as a result of a new government scheme.

The new drug – pembrolizumab, a treatment targeting advanced skin cancer – is the first medicine to be approved through the Early Access to Medicines scheme (EAMS). Launched in England last April, its aim is to get pioneering drugs to seriously ill patients more quickly.

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